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'Robbie Keane can have my record', says Ireland's leading goalscorer

Honoured torch-bearer Olivia O’Toole says she would be more than happy for her male counterpart to overhaul her tally.

'Lads, I have more talent in this finger...'
'Lads, I have more talent in this finger...'
Image: Danny Lawson/LOCOG/Press Association Images

WITH 54 GOALS to her name in over 130 appearances for the girls in green, Olivia O’Toole could be forgiven for hoping Ireland win in Poland without the aid of Robbie Keane’s goalscoring touch.

Keane has netted 53 times for his country, making him by far Ireland’s leading male scorer. But O’Toole still has the edge.

After being honoured to carry the Olympic torch on a leg in Dublin 1 – between Mayor Street and Seville Place – O’Toole told Des Cahill of RTE Radio of her plans to travel to Poland to cheer on the boys in green, but if things go well, her own standing in the game will be the last thing on her mind.

“He’s only one (behind),” she said of Ireland’s other prolific striker, “I’m going to the Euros so if he scores the winner against Croatia or Spain I won’t care about any record.”

She added that the performance against Croatia is key, ”If they get a good result in the first game then I think they’ll do very well.”

As for carrying the Olympic flame, O’Toole was bowled over by the support that lined the street to see her and the flame.

“It was brilliant coming down the street. I knew there would be friends and family there, but I was gob-smacked. I just want to say thanks very much for the support.”

Fellow torch-bearer, Shane Horgan, chirped: “She had more fans than Jedward”.

O’Toole spoke briefly of the organisation involved and that she had been asked; first to walk and soon after, run as time constraints took hold. However, the lasting memory of the day will always be the torch itself, an item she can now keep as a reminder.

“That’s the best thing about it,” beamed O’Toole, “you know you get to keep it and you will have an Olympic torch for the rest of your life.”

Here’s where to see the Olympic Torch today

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Sean Farrell

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