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'A legend and a gentleman who made an outstanding contribution to Irish football'

Ray Treacy died last night after a short illness.

Ray Treacy won 42 caps for the Republic of Ireland.
Ray Treacy won 42 caps for the Republic of Ireland.
Image: Billy Stickland/INPHO

FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION OF Ireland chief executive John Delaney has described Ray Treacy as ‘a legend of Irish football’.

Treacy, a former Republic of Ireland striker who was capped 42 times, died last night after a short illness. He was 68.

The Dubliner spent 13 seasons in English football with the likes of West Brom and Charlton, before returning to Ireland for spells — as both a player and manager — with Shamrock Rovers and Drogheda United.

“Ray Treacy will be missed deeply by everyone involved in the game,” said FAI president Tony Fitzgerald. “He was a great player and a gentleman who made an outstanding contribution to Irish football at all levels.

“That was recognised when he was inducted into our Hall of Fame in 2009. Our thoughts and prayers at this difficult time are with all of his family and many friends.”

Treacy scored five goals for the Republic of Ireland between 1966 and 1980, including the winner in a World Cup qualifier against France at Dalymount Park in 1972. The FAI says it will honour Treacy’s contribution to Irish football at its international matches in June.

John Delaney said: “We are all deeply saddened at the passing of Ray Treacy. He was a legend of Irish football and made a unique contribution to his country, to schoolboy football and to the League of Ireland.

“As the FAI’s official travel agent he helped thousands of Irish supporters follow the team all over the globe, particularly to the World Cups in 1990, 1994 and 2002.  We offer our sincere condolences to his family, his wife Jenny, his daughters Karen and Lisa, and two sons John and Gary.”

Irish football has lost one of its favourite sons

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