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Dublin: 12 °C Monday 10 August, 2020
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Remember Sensible Soccer? Here’s how some of Ireland’s most famous goals would look

Add one part football geekdom and one part happy memories, and this is what you get.

REMEMBER SENSIBLE SOCCER? If you like football and you owned an Amiga, chances are you will never forget it.

It looked something like this:

YouTube Credit: mingo870

Call us nerds, but we’re big fans of retro computer games around here. So it’s no surprise that we fell in love with Pixel Replay.com, a new website set up to re-create classic goals as though they happened in Sensible Soccer.

Cantona against Liverpool in the 1996 FA Cup Final? Bergkamp against Newcastle? Yeboah against Wimbledon? They’ve got them all — and more.

The men behind the magic have specially designed three of Ireland’s most famous goals for us. There’s Liam Brady showing the Brazilians how to play in 1987:

YouTube Credit: FatherTed2006

(PixelReplay.com)

Ray Houghton’s winner against Italy at the USA 1994 World Cup, complete with Pagliuca in no man’s land:

YouTube Credit: illumin

(PixelReplay.com)

And Robbie Keane’s last-gasp equaliser against Germany in Ibaraki in 2002. Quinny’s header still looks every bit as good:

YouTube Credit: Aodhancfc92

(PixelReplay.com)

If you’re desperate to see your favourite goal immortalised in all its pixellated glory — we’re thinking Dave Barry v Bayern Munich or Pat Sullivan v Partizan Belgrade — you’ll find more details on that here.

VIDEO: Dubliner Graham Carey scored an absolute thronker for St Mirren last night

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About the author:

Niall Kelly

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