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New €80 million Páirc Uí Chaoimh stadium could stage 2017 Munster senior finals

The 45,000 capacity stadium is on course to be completed next June.

A projected image of the re-developed Páirc Uí Chaoimh

THE RE-DEVELOPED Páirc Uí Chaoimh is on course to be opened in June 2017 with next summer’s Munster senior finals potentially the first major fixtures for the 45,000 capacity stadium.

An official launch took place today of the stadium’s Premium Level scheme with construction of the new €80 million stadium still on course to be finished by June next year.

That completion date would make it an option for the Munster Council when the provincial body selects the venues for next July’s Munster senior hurling and football finals.

The project is being financed by state aid of €30 million, which has been approved by the EU Commission, a grant from the GAA Central Council of €20 million, €10 million from the Cork county board’s own reserves, €3.75 million from the Munster Council and the funding shortfall will be met by the sale of Premium Tickets and other commercial initiatives.

New €80 million Páirc Uí Chaoimh stadium could stage 2017 Munster senior finals
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  • Pairc Ui Chaoimh Aerial View

  • Pairc Ui Chaoimh - Hospiitality Area South Stand

  • Pairc Ui Chaoimh Grandstand

    Source: Pedersen Focus Ltd
  • Pairc Ui Choaimh Arrival at South Stand

  • Pairc Ui Choaimh Arrival at South Stand

Páirc Uí Chaoimh was yesterday confirmed as part of the 12 stadia that will make up Ireland’s 2023 Rugby World Cup bid.

Features of the new stadium include:

  • Covered seating for 21,000 spectators
  • Terrace capacity for 24,00 spectators
  • Large dressing-rooms and warm-up areas
  • Physio and rehab facilities
  • Gym and all-weather pitch
  • The first stadium in Ireland to meet EU standards on access
  • 32 hot food kiosks, shops and bars
  • 72 turnstiles (twice the previous number)

The “Priority at Páirc Uí Chaoimh’ ticket scheme is limited to 2,000 seats which are located at the second tier of the South Stand and are priced at €6,500 for a ten-year ticket.

Those premium ticket holders will have access to all All-Ireland and provincial championship games, National League matches, club matches as well as access to a range of dining, entertainment and hospitality options located at premium level.

Members will have early access to tickets for other events and concerts as well.

The progress of the project has been welcomed.

Ger Lane, Cork GAA chairman:

The Páirc Uí Chaoimh Stadium and Centre of Excellence set the bar very high. The board is very proud that in the summer of next year we will have a stadium to rank with any around. The GAA public deserves top class, modern facilities to house its games and to meet today’s expectations.”

Bob Ryan, chairman of the Stadium Steering Committee:

The redevelopment project is a huge construction project in the first instance. Bar one, every contractor and sub contractor on site is from Cork. Everyone is working extremely hard to ensure we reach our targets. We have endeavoured to keep disruption arising from the project to the minimum.”

John Mullins, chair of the Stadium Business Committee:

This is, first and foremost, an outstanding facility to watch Gaelic Games and other events. The vantage points are uninterrupted by columns or other infrastrucutre. We expect a very rapid take up of the Premium Ticket Scheme and there is already huge interest.”

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Fintan O'Toole

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