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GAA reveal Christy Ring changes, new minor format and plans for the mark

The redevelopment of Ruislip and where London will play their matches next year was also discussed.

A general view of the Christy Ring Cup.
A general view of the Christy Ring Cup.
Image: Tommy Dickson/INPHO

THE GAA HAVE today released details on changes to the Christy Ring Cup and Minor Championship, as well as information on how the Mark will work in Gaelic football among other topics.

The following issues were discussed at last weekend’s Central Council Meeting:

  • The details of the motion passed regarding admission of Christy Ring Cup winners to the Liam MacCarthy Cup in the same year were elaborated on. A statement read: “This new motion will ask that the Christy Ring Cup winners (from Championship 2017 onwards) be included in a Preliminary Round game in the All-Ireland Qualifiers, where they would be drawn against one of the losers of the three Leinster Hurling Championship quarter finals. Provision will be made for such a Preliminary Round qualifier when the 2017 Master Fixtures schedule is being prepared.”
  • It was also agreed that, amid the redevelopment of Ruislip, London “would be permitted to play all of their Allianz league games (in both Hurling and Football) AWAY from home on the understanding that all of their Allianz league games in 2018 will be played at home.”
  • In addition, from 1 January 2018, “intercounty minor competitions in football and hurling will be played at U17 rather than U18 level. To accommodate players who are currently playing at U16 level (2016) and who would be overage for the new minor competitions in 2018 (and would therefore miss out on the opportunity to play “Minor” for their county), Central Council had previously decided to play U17 Championships in Football and Hurling in 2017, alongside the inter-county Minor championships. At Saturday’s meeting, it was confirmed that these U17 championships will be organised on a provincial basis as per the existing Minor championships, with the winner in each province going through to the All-Ireland semi- finals (no quarter-finals). All games will be played to a finish on the day i.e. mandatory extra time followed by free taking to ensure a conclusive result.”
  • On the topic of the new Playing rule with regard to the Mark, from October 2016, the following changes will be implemented — “1. The Referee shall award the “Mark” by blowing the whistle. 2. On or past the 45m line shall mean that both feet of the catcher are on or past the 45m line when he catches the ball or on landing. 3. In order to signify that he wishes to take a free-kick the player who catches the ball and has been awarded a “Mark” by the Referee should stop playing. If he does not obviously stop then it should be taken that he is “Playing on”. 4. “Challenged” as mentioned in the rule is taken as “tackle” as defined; once the player plays on he may be tackled after four steps or once he plays the ball in any way.”
  • Finally, a “uniform policy on the use of scoreboard clocks was agreed at Saturday’s meeting. Most venues allow the clock to run until the referee sounds the half-time or full-time whistle, while some stop the clock when the 35 minute or 70 minute mark has been reached. It was agreed that, in future, the clock will run until the referee blows the half-time or full-time whistle.”

For further info on these changes, click here.

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Paul Fennessy

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