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Harry Redknapp: 'I write like a two-year-old'

Jurors heard recordings of an police interview with Tottenham Hotspur manager Harry Redknapp at Southwark Crown Court today.

Harry Redknapp leaving Southwark Crown Court on Monday.
Harry Redknapp leaving Southwark Crown Court on Monday.
Image: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire/Press Association Images

HARRY REDKNAPP TOLD detectives investigating his financial affairs that he writes “like a two-year-old” and is too disorganised to dodge his taxes, a court heard today.

Jurors at Southwark Crown Court were played a tape of the Tottenham Hotspur manager’s questioning by London police on the fourth day of his trial for allegedly cheating the public revenue.

Redknapp and his co-defendant, former Portsmouth chairman Milan Mandaric, are accused of allegedly concealing two transfer payments worth $295,000 in a Monaco bank account to avoid paying taxes. Both men deny the charges.

“I am completely and utterly disorganised,” Redknapp said (see Daily Telegraph). “I am not going to fiddle taxes, I pay my accountant a fortune to look after me.”

You talk to anybody at the football club. I don’t write. I couldn’t even fill a team sheet in.

Earlier today, a Monaco bank executive told the court that Redknapp was the only signature on record for the “Rosie 47″ account in which the transfer payments in question were lodged.

David Cusdin, vice-president of HSBC in Monaco between 2000 and 2005, delivered his testimony via videolink.

“I was certainly aware of his visit – it was quite possible that I didn’t open the account, it was one of my team – but I was certainly aware of the visit,” Cusdin said (see Sky News).

Asked by John Black QC for the prosecution if it was necessary for the client to be present, Cusdin replied: “Normally, yes. The client would have to be present.”

The trial continues.

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Niall Kelly

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