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Tyrone GAA plan sponsorship future without Target Express

The county says it is “disappointed to learn that Target Express have been left with no other choice but to cease trading.”

The Target Express logo, seen on Stephen O'Neill's jersey.
The Target Express logo, seen on Stephen O'Neill's jersey.
Image: ©INPHO/Cathal Noonan

TYRONE GAA’S COUNTY BOARD has expressed its sympathy with those set to lose their jobs following the announcement that Target Express has ceased trading.

The haulage firm, which employs almost 400 people across the Republic and Northern Ireland, is Tyrone’s main sponsor but county bosses reassured fans on Tuesday that the financial future of their teams remains secure.

Target Express said on Monday that it was forced to cease trading after the Revenue Commissioners rejected a deal to settle an outstanding debt.

The company partnered Tyrone since February 2009 in a deal described by officials as “among the top three or four sponsorship deals for any county in Ireland.” It had already indicated that it would not be renewing the agreement beyond the end of the current season.

The county is confident that it will have a new sponsor in place before Christmas 2012.

Tyrone’s statement read: “The Tyrone County GAA Board are disappointed to learn that Target Express have been left with no other choice but to cease trading.

“Our thoughts are with the hundreds of people who are about to lose their jobs throughout Ireland and the management of the company. These job losses will impact on people within our own county.

“Target Express had already indicated to us that they would not be renewing sponsorship of our county teams beyond the end of the 2012 season. We wish to thank Target Express for their generous sponsorship of our county teams over the last three years.

“Tyrone GAA has a very robust financial management strategy and we are confident that a new sponsorship partnership will be in place before Christmas 2012.”

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Niall Kelly

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